Congresswoman Susan W. Brooks

Representing the 5th District of Indiana
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
YouTube icon
Instagram icon

Second Amendment

I am a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, and I will work tirelessly in Congress to ensure that our constitutional rights are never infringed.  I do not believe an assault rifle ban would be a wise or useful policy.  I do, however, believe we have an obligation to do our best to keep guns out of the hands of criminals and those that are truly mentally ill in order to protect our families and friends.  Therefore, I am open to considering legislation that requires background checks for all guns sold at gun shows so long as the background checks remain quick and efficient, do not lead to any national registration of firearms or gun owners, and does not extend to sales between private citizens.

More on Second Amendment

Aug 26, 2019 In The News

News-Sentinel.com advocated for the use of red flag laws early this month following the mass shootings that killed 31 in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas.

The Kokomo Tribune recently reported on a case in Greentown in Howard County last month that illustrates how the red flag law is used in Indiana when police officers seized all the firearms of a man who had been firing his weapons in his house while hallucinating.

Aug 24, 2019 In The News

GREENTOWN – Last month, law enforcement officers responded to a house in Greentown, in which a man fired off 10 rounds inside the residence after hallucinating that someone had broken into his home.

Greentown Police Marshal James Skinner said no one had broken in, but there were other people inside at the time, all of whom could have been shot in the incident.

Skinner was called by Howard County deputies to the scene in the 400 block of East Walnut Street, where he talked to two women outside who escaped from the house and reported the man was hallucinating.

Aug 18, 2019 In The News

INDIANAPOLIS – After two mass shootings left 31 people dead in Texas and Ohio in recent weeks, President Donald Trump has called for new red flag laws, which are currently in place in just 17 states including Indiana.

Indiana's Red Flag Law is known as the Jake Laird Law.

Passed in 2005, it has been used more than 700 times in Indianapolis, allowing officers to temporarily take guns away from someone if they find probable cause that the person may hurt themselves or others.

Aug 16, 2019 In The News

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – From the pace of the headlines coming out of Washington, you would hardly know Congress is currently on a break.

Several topics are prompting intense discussion, debate and possibly some cooperation.

Representative Susan Brooks stopped by Daybreak Friday.

She discussed a number of issues, including the recent mass shootings and whether she feels expanded background checks and red flag laws are the answer in identifying potential shooters.

Aug 16, 2019 In The News

INDIANAPOLIS -- "Red flag laws have been extremely effective in Indiana." The words of Indiana Congresswoman Susan Brooks. 

She is back in Indiana talking with constituents about the gun debate that is front and center in Washington. Brooks has re-introduced the Jake Laird law in Congress, which is essentially the same law that has been on the books as a "red flag law" since 2005. 

Aug 15, 2019 In The News

ANDERSON – After the latest round of mass shootings across the country, U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks is hoping to get passage of a national “red flag” law.

Indiana is one of 17 states that currently have a “red flag” law. Indiana's law was adopted in 2005 and named after slain police officer Jake Laird.

The law allows law enforcement officials to seize weapons from an individual that could be a danger to themselves or others. A court has to approve the return of the weapon.

Aug 6, 2019 In The News

Attention surrounding red flag laws is growing after President Donald Trump's comments supporting the gun control measure following the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio. 

"We must make sure that those judged to pose a grave risk to public safety do not have access to firearms and that if they do those firearms can be taken through rapid due process," Trump said, according to USA TODAY's reporting. "That is why I have called for red flag laws, also known as extreme risk protection orders."

Aug 6, 2019 In The News

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – After two mass shootings left 31 people dead in Texas and Ohio over the weekend, President Donald Trump called for red flag laws.

Neither state has this legislation, but Indiana is one of 17 states with its own version.

Indiana's Red Flag Law is known as the Jake Laird Law.

Since the law passed in 2005, it has been used more than 700 times in Indianapolis.

“It always takes a tragedy for people to start talking again about things,” said Mike Laird, Jake's father.

Jake was shot and killed in the line of duty in 2004.

May 20, 2019 In The News

The bipartisan Jake Laird Act was reintroduced in the U.S. House of Representatives last week during National Police Week and Mental Health Awareness Month.

The bill enables local law enforcement to temporarily remove and retain firearms with probable cause from individuals who are determined to be an imminent danger to themselves or others.

The bill also provides grants to states to provide police officers with additional training with the goal of deescalating life-threatening crises and preventing future potentially deadly events.

May 19, 2019 In The News

As we reflect on National Police Week, which ended Saturday, let’s provide our law enforcement across the country every tool possible to prevent senseless acts of gun violence from harming or claiming the lives of innocent people, including our law enforcement officers.

Children are frequently asked the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” The answer for Timothy “Jake” Laird from Noblesville was always the same. He dreamed of becoming a police officer.