Congresswoman Susan W. Brooks

Representing the 5th District of Indiana
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Restoring Confidence in Congress

Restoring confidence in Congress has been a goal of mine since the beginning of my Congressional service. The House Committee on Ethics has an important role to play in holding members, officers and staff accountable to the American people and to our colleagues. I have served on this committee since my first term in Congress. The committee is the only one in the House made up of an equal number of members from the Republican and Democrat parties.

This year I was named Chairwoman of the House Committee on Ethics for the 115th Congress. In this position, I am committed to hold our members to a high standard of conduct; to conduct fair investigations into allegations and questions brought before the Committee; and to effectively and transparently communicate the Congressional ethics rules and standards to Members, staff and the American people.

Hearing directly from my constituents is extremely important to me, and ensures that I am able to best represent those living in the Fifth District. I regularly host Connect With Your Congresswoman events throughout the district to meet with small groups and individuals about the issues that matter most to them. These events are in addition to the constituents I meet with at regular meetings, employee town halls and site visits throughout the Fifth District and in D.C. as well as the letters, emails and telephone calls I receive from constituents. I believe that having open lines of communication with your representatives is a critical piece of restoring trust in public officials.

To watch my “What I’m Hearing” video series where I answer common questions I receive from Hoosiers and address top issues, click here and follow me on Facebook and Twitter for the latest.

 

More on Restoring Confidence in Congress

Feb 10, 2019 In The News

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing a divided Congress for the first time, President Donald Trump on Tuesday called on Washington to reject “the politics of revenge, resistance and retribution.” He warned emboldened Democrats that “ridiculous partisan investigations” into his administration and businesses could hamper a surging American economy.

Jan 16, 2019 In The News

Trump is still encouraging Republicans to help break the impasse, and will be joined in the situation room by members of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus later today. It’s unclear if Democrats will attend. Rep. Susan Brooks (R-Indiana), who attended Tuesday’s meeting, said one of Trump’s key messages to GOP lawmakers was: “We have to get these negotiations going again.” Brooks added that “a lot of us who attended the meeting are now talking to [Democratic] colleagues — on the floor and off the floor.”

Jan 15, 2019 In The News

No House Democrats will attend a White House-organized lunch meeting on Tuesday with President Donald Trump as the partial government shutdown continues, a sign of how dug in both sides are with no deal in sight.

The White House invited a group of members from the chamber’s Blue Dog Coalition for a lunch discussion on the 25th day of the shutdown. 

Jan 15, 2019 In The News

WASHINGTON – No progress was made toward ending the partial government shutdown Tuesday as only Republicans showed up to a White House lunch with President Trump.

The House Republicans who attended took the opportunity to criticize their Democratic colleagues — while admitting that they’re negotiating with them behind-the-scenes.

“The sheer fact that not a single Democrat was able to show up is pretty telling as to who wants to negotiate and who doesn’t,” said Rodney Davis (R-Ill.), one of the nine GOP House members in attendance.

Jan 15, 2019 In The News

Seven of the House Republicans who came to the White House for lunch spoke to reporters following their meal with the President, vice president, and other administration officials.

The consensus amongst the Republicans: "Disappointment.”

“This was supposed to be a bipartisan lunch,” Illinois Rep. Rodney Davis said, asking, “If you don’t show up to the table, how in the world are we ever going to come to a solution?”

Jan 10, 2019 In The News

(CNN)As federal employees brace themselves for their first missed paychecks on Friday, some members of Congress have decided to join them in a show of solidarity and refuse their paychecks.

Jan 9, 2019 In The News

Think of the faces routinely seen on the front lines of community litter cleanups, school sports banquets, candidate forums, church meetings, farmers' markets, downtown festivals and food kitchens.

Many are women. In some cases, a majority are women and have been for a long time.

Now, think of the elected officials running the municipal, state and national governments. Most are men. Nearly three-quarters of the officeholders are male. The public leadership does not mirror the population.

Jan 8, 2019 In The News

CARMEL – Having worked in a bipartisan manner during her first six years in the U.S. House, Rep. Susan Brooks believes it gives her an advantage in the current Democrat-controlled legislative chamber.

Brooks, R-5th District, said Monday, during an interview with The Herald Bulletin, that one of the first bills to be considered Tuesday is legislative dealing with pandemics and biological hazards.

Brooks said she worked with Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., on the legislation that passed the House in 2018 but wasn’t given a hearing in the U.S. Senate.

Jan 8, 2019 In The News

CARMEL – Having worked in a bipartisan manner during her first six years in the U.S. House, Rep. Susan Brooks believes it gives her an advantage in the current Democrat-controlled legislative chamber.

Brooks, R-5th District, said Monday, during an interview with The Herald Bulletin, that one of the first bills to be considered Tuesday is legislative dealing with pandemics and biological hazards.

Brooks said she worked with Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., on the legislation that passed the House in 2018 but wasn’t given a hearing in the U.S. Senate.

Jan 8, 2019 In The News

CARMEL – Having worked in a bipartisan manner during her first six years in the U.S. House, Rep. Susan Brooks believes it gives her an advantage in the current Democrat-controlled legislative chamber.

Brooks, R-5th District, said Monday, during an interview with The Herald Bulletin, that one of the first bills to be considered Tuesday is legislative dealing with pandemics and biological hazards.

Brooks said she worked with Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., on the legislation that passed the House in 2018 but wasn’t given a hearing in the U.S. Senate.