Congresswoman Susan W. Brooks

Representing the 5th District of Indiana
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Pro-Life

I am a pro-life Member of Congress.  I will oppose any federal dollars being spent to perform abortions.

More on Pro-Life

Feb 17, 2017 In The News

WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a measure, 230-188, that overturns an Obama administration rule forcing states to fund abortion providers with taxpayer dollars. Indiana’s seven pro-life U.S. representatives voted to advance the measure and protect taxpayers – Reps. Jackie Walorski (IN-2), Jim Banks (IN-3), Todd Rokita (IN-2), Susan Brooks (IN-5), Luke Messer (IN-6), Larry Bucshon (IN-8) and Trey Hollingsworth (IN-9).

Feb 1, 2017 News Releases

Washington, D.C. - Rep. Susan Brooks released the following statement is support of President Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court, Judge Neil Gorsuch:

Jan 25, 2017 In The News

WASHINGTON – Today, seven of Indiana’s U.S. representatives voted for H.R. 7, the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act. The pro-life representatives who voted to bar taxpayer funding of abortion were: Reps. Jackie Walorski (IN-2), Jim Banks (IN-3), Todd Rokita (IN-2), Susan Brooks (IN-5), Luke Messer (IN-6), Larry Bucshon (IN-8) and Trey Hollingsworth (IN-9).

Jan 6, 2016 News Releases

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Today, Congresswoman Susan W. Brooks (R-IN05) voted in favor of H.R. 3762, the Restoring American’s Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act, which paves the way for patient-centered health care solutions and repeals as much of Obamacare as possible through the budget reconciliation process. This legislation passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 240 - 181. Brooks released the following statement after the vote:

Sep 21, 2015 In The News
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A divided House voted Friday to block Planned Parenthood's federal funds for a year, as Republican leaders labored to keep GOP outrage over abortion from spiraling into an impasse with President Barack Obama that could shut down the government.
 
The House used a nearly party-line 241-187 vote to clear the legislation, which stands little chance of enactment. Senate Democrats have enough votes to block it, and for good measure the White House has promised a veto.